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turn away from democracy as eastern europe did 50 years ago? i talked to pulitzer prize winning historian anne happalbaum. >>> the administration had a choice save chrysler by injecting taxpayer dollars or let it fail and let it lose perhaps a million jobs. car czar steve ratner gives us a fascinating inside look. for viewers in the united states, we have a special tonight at 8:00 and 11:00 p.m. eastern and pacific called "tough decisions." >>> but, first, here's my take. announcing that he would send proposals on reducing gun violence in america to congress, president obama this week mentioned a number of sensible gun control measures. but he also paid homage to the conventional washington wisdom from mental health issues to school safety. his spokesman jay carney said earlier this is a complex problem that will require complex solution. gun control carney from the only answer. let me respectfully disagree. the problem is not complex and the solution is blindingly obvious. there are three sets of causes that people point to when talking about events like the one in newtown. fir
're cleaner than europe is right now. >> right. >> so we haven't felt it. my main worry is the following, that if the republicans and democrats can't get together to solve the fiscal cliff you will need an external force, a major market sell-off, you will need a major economic trauma to get them to poex. >> other things have been on the table. i want to talk to our viewers about a few of those as soon as we come back. coming up next, republicans want a new formula for inflation. it's called chained cpi. not a bad idea overall but it could slow the payments to social security recipients. the president has said he could agree to it but democrat lawmakers say no way. [ male announcer ] it's simple physics... a body at rest tends to stay at rest... while a body in motion tends to stay in motion. staying active can actually ease arthritis symptoms. but if you have arthritis, staying active can be difficult. prescription celebrex can help relieve arthritis pain so your body can stay in motion. because just one 200mg celebrex a day can provide 24 hour relief for many with arthritis pain and inf
. >>> and the next phase of europe's crisis. which nations might find themselves split apart. i'll explain. >>> first, here is my take. arafat's body has been exhumed for investigation. bringing back memories of the unpredictable palestinian leader. the news broke at a time when a conventional wisdom has begun to take hold that the middle east today is much more dangerous, unstable, violent and anti-american than before. let's take a look at facts. in the 1980s the newly empowered radical islamic republic of iran unsettled the region with its promise to spread its revolution elsewhere. lebanon was in the midst of a bloody civil war. that engulfed itself and the palestinians and israel. iran and iraq fought a gruesome war with over one million casualties. hezbollah attacked u.s. armed forces directly forcing a humiliating withdrawal from lebanon. a cia station chief was tortured and killed, and u.s. secrets and interests compromised, and that was just in one decade. or consider those days from israel's point of view. during the 1980s, jerusalem faced well arms regimes. leading members of the rejection
, but we are cleaner than europe is right now. so we haven't felt it. my main worry is the following. if the republicans and the democrats can't get together to solve the fiscal cliff, then you will need an external force, you will need major market selloff. you will need a major economic trauma to get them to focus. >> there are other things that have been on the table. i want to talk about a few of those, as soon as we come back. coming up, the republicans want a new formula for inflation, it's called chained cpi, it could slow the growth in payments to social security recipients, that's got some people mad. the president has said he could agree do it, but democratic lawmakers say no way. [ bells dinging ] ♪ hark how the bells, sweet silver bells ♪ ♪ all seem to say throw care away ♪ ♪ from everywhere, filling the air ♪ [ female announcer ] chex party mix. easy 15-minute homemade recipes you just pop in a microwave. like caramel chocolate drizzles. happier holidays. chex party mix. happier holidays. santho, ho, ho!anta! santa! want to see some magic? watch this! merry c
and nuclear weapons. it will result in weapons ownership. look at europe. look at japan. look at the rest of the world. we are way, way out there. we have the highest murder rate in the world. it hasn't protected us. it has resulted in arguments that should have a consequence of maybe a slap in the face, resulting in a bullet through the heart. it results in a double-murder in this case, a murder/suicide. guns don't protect. they cause suicide. >> let me bring in -- >> they cause suicide? >> i can promise, i'll get back to you, carol. here is what they say to me. i've had it all. but trying to get a debate going. i've been on two years on cnn. in that time, there's been a series of gun rages. each time it is the same debate and nothing gets done about it. 300 million guns and you have between 11,000 and 12,000 guns and murders a year. by comparison, britain has 35 as does germany and australia. japan has one or two. to countries that have strict gun control have very little gun murder. what do you say to americans who say it makes me feel safe? >> i think carole had it right. she said it
rating. i've warned you over and over about the economic storm headed our way partly because of europe and this fiscal lif, but i've also told you about an american economic renaissance that could be just ahead. just beyond the storm clouds. the fiscal cliff is fixable, but every day washington fails to make a deal, more damage is being doing. john king, ken rogoff and diane swan, chief economist at mezaro financial. john, right now, this is more politics than the economy. some people are saying don't sweat it. the threat of going over the fiscal cliff is overblown. it will get done. an 11th hour deal. john, as you read the politics at play, what do you see? >> i see both sides digging in. you've just played the president saying i want that rate hike. the republicans are saying mr. president, we'll give you the revenues, but not through a rate hike, but the president believes he won the election and he's upped the ante. says he wants twice as much in tax revenues than a year and a half ago, so the president believes he has the higher ground. i think maybe the democrats have a deeper tr
ownership. look at europe and the rest of the world. we are way, way out there. we have the highest murder rate in the world. >> abbey, here is what they say to me. each time it is the same debate and nothing gets done about it. 300 million guns and you have between 11 and 12,000 guns and murders a year. britain has 35 as does germany and australia. to countries that have strict gun kcontrol have little gun murder. i think carole had it right. she said it is about personal responsibility. that is the most important part. it is a difficult one. people are going to have an oh w pinion about it. we have to make sure that they were -- wanted the american people to feel protected about the british at the time. i don't think people should be able to go online and buy guns. there should be rules in place on background checks. our country is founded on these freedoms. i totally respect the constitution by the way. what i don't respect is what i don't respect is the interpretation of the letter of the second amendment of the constitution which i think is being misused to endorse everyone in america
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to happen in europe, and we don't know what's going to happen in greece and we don't know what's going to have in the euro zone and the energy needs in china and india and industrialized nations. what do you think is the biggest threat from the outside to the u.s. economy? >> the fiscal cliff. first of all i think there are issues that are beginning to improve and, you know, whether you look at the euro zone which is making progress, gradually, laboriously and certainly improving and with good numbers because if you look at thinge ia because if you look at thinge a greg gat euro zone debt, and you have political stability back now that the new team is in place so the volatility and the instability factors that are outside have reduced. the real threat that we have at the moment is really here with us and that can be addressed. >> but when you look at, i mean i understood that the european banks had sort of downsized or downgraded what they thought would be growth. you've got more than 11% unemployment in the euro zone, which is a good deal higher than here. >> yeah yeah. >> are those
murder rates. we have lower murder rates in other parts of the country than even in europe. than even where you come from. but what has created a problem in the united states, is to say in cities and schools, those are areas where we're not going to allow them to defend themselves? >> what is the murder rate in great britain for the last three years? >> it's under 3 for 100,000. >> just give me a number. >> it's actually .3 per 100,000. about a tenth of what it is in your vaunted english bucolic country, sir. the fact of the matter with guns comes safety. if the guns are in the hands of the good guys. when you say the good guys can't have guns, the bad guys have a monopoly and horrible things sufficient as shootings at schools take place. >> the ar-15 as we've seen in the last three shootings, aurora, the shopping mall in oregon and now sandy hook, the preferred weapon for young men who want to transfer hundreds of bullets of rapid fire if you have the right magazines. the president has stated he wants to ban weapons like this. what is your view? >> i think we need to ban gun control
. >> austerity, is the fiscal cliff sort of like austerity? >> absolutely. >> and europe haven't done so severely. >> that's the point. maybe we can put this off, but you can't put off reality. you're going to pay the piper. the question is the creation of washington of the fiscal cliff or a creation of your investors and bondholders across the world that look at you in the same light as europe some day. we all know that day isn't here. this is a lesson for the republican party, and i think it's a lesson we should all take. instead of when we look at all these programs, mark, where are we going to make cuts and how terrible is this going to be, we need to judge our concern and empat empathy, not by the money, something marco rubio and paul ryan talked about, by the outcomes, not how much we spend but what we get out of it. look at something how much money we throw at it we'll august suggest more, more, more. >> government does such a good job tracking outcomes. >> let's track the outcomes of tax loopholes so if we're going to evaluate outcomes it's important to evaluate the outcomes of tax loopho
of europe and partly because of this fiscal cliff. i also told you about an american economic renaissance that could be just ahead. just beyond the storm clouds. the fiscal cliff is fixable. every day washington fails to make a deal, more damage is being done. john king, ken rogath is the former chief economist at the international monetary fund and diane swonk joins us from mezro financial. john, some people say don't sweat it. the threat of going over the fiscal cliff is overblown. it will get done in an 11th hour deal. as you read the politics at play, what do you see? >> both sides digging in. you played the president saying, i want that rate hike. the republicans say we'll give you the revenues but not through a rate hike. the president believes he won the election and he upped the ante saying he wants twice as much in tax revenues than he wanted a year and a half ago. the president believes he has higher ground under this. i think maybe the democrats have a deeper trench, if you will. they have public opinion on their side. if you talk to people in washington there is a sense that a
the data leads. we'll leave our politics at the door. >> similar studies are under way in europe and canada. and he is offering treatments for veterans, firefighters and police officers. and here with me now is rachel hope. and you know i should start off by pointing out because people watch that, nobody is saying that street ecstasy is safe. a lot of times you don't know what you're getting, for sure if you're not in a controlled setting what it is doing to you. but that was not to situation for you, necessarily. you were doing this in a controlled setting. what was it like? you had never done anything like this before. >> yeah, i had never done anything like that. but it made it so comfortable for me, and prepared me, so when i -- i got the medicine, i had an idea what would happen. but it was pretty remarkable. >> you described it, if i remember correctly, like your brain lit up like a christmas tree. most people have no idea what that means, they have never done this. >> i don't either, i really want to know why it felt like that. like all of my systems were lit up. like i was -- just -
of diplomacy helped broker a cease-fire. number three, in europe greece was the problem child that spent too much, save nothing and threatened to take down the euro. new leadership didn't stop constant violent protests, staged by those facing loss of jobs, pay cuts, higher taxes as their weary government begs for more cash. europe's leaders including the new french president committed to save the euro. it lives on, but for how long? number two. the deadliest month to date as the assad regime intensified its use of air power. >> one of the questions most asked in 2012, was how much longer can this man hold on to power? assad was under intense pressure to step down. but his regime stepped up the fire power against the opposition. civilians caught in the crossfire. more than 40,000 people have died so far. >> this is, yet, another bread line. >> the opposition fights on making more dramatic gains than ever and gaining pledges of additional support for the international community. number one -- she fought back from the brink of death after being attacked on a school bus. the taliban shocked. she
. it could be another three to six months could go to a zoo in europe, australia, where wherever it might be, to keep the gene pool fresh. these animals are so rare we have to know exactly the breeding program. >> why are you not remotely scared of them? >> it's not a matter -- that's a good question. people ask me if i'm scared. if i find myself afraid or scared, that means i'm going the wrong thing. they know the animal very well, so i've been around them. i don't raise them like these guys do, but having raised tigers, my wife and i have raised, tigers, lions, leopards, everything in your 40 years of marriage. so you know cats when you do that much. see how he's licking me? if that were a full-grown tiger, piers, in less than three minutes he could lick me to the bone. that's how rough the tongue gets. sand paper like you wouldn't believe. >> when they're full sized, how many are left in the world? two to 400. that's all there is. >> two of the last remaining siberian tigers. >> in the zoo world we do quite well with them. in india, the bengal tiger, seen them take down a water buffalo in
in europe, greece was the problem child that spent too much, saved nothing and threatened to take down the euro. new leadership, pay cuts, higher taxes as their weary government begs for more cash. committing to save the euro. it lives on, but for how long? >> the deadliest month to date as the assad regime intensified its air power. >> how much longer can this man hold on to power? bashar al assad was under even more intense pressure to step down but his regime stepped up the fire power against the opposition, civilians caught in the crossfire, more than 40,000 people have died so far. >> reporter: this is yet another bread line. >> the opposition fights on, making more dramatic gains than ever and gaining pledges of support from the international community. number one, she fought back from the brink of death after being attacked on a school bus. the taliban shot malala yousafzai. she survived, wake up in a british hospital and, according to her father, immediately asked for her school books. the world was gripped, moved and inspired by the story of one determined young girl facing do
surpassed north maeshg and europe combined in terms of global power, based upon gdp, population size, military spending and technological spending. china alone will probably have the largest economy, surpassing that of the united states a few years before 2030. people because of technology, people really have more power than they've ever had before, individuals have more power an that can also cause problems with, you know, people using technology for ill means. >> is this the whole report? >> the 140-page rundown. i'm sure the president gets a bigger one. >> this is an intelligence report. >> yes. >> why on earth would anyone buy a jillion dollar card for starbucks. >> this is the question of the surgery. they had a $450 stainless steel elite card. now they're on ebay getting them for maybe $1,000. some is of the bids are up to $1,000. it's collectors item for the to be 1%. these starbucks limited edition gift cards have sparked a frenzy on ebay of people who want to hold on to this. >> it's the perfect gift for people who like to buy overpriced coffee already. >> you get perks, lik
overseas in asia and europe. i would scale back -- i would get rid of the ethanol subsidy altogether. i'd scale back on the crop subsidies. i think there are things we have to do. i would do those things. >> congressman, pleasure to talk to you. thank you for joining us to day to give us a sense of where things should go. >> my pleasure, i'd like to be back. >> robert andrews, democrat from new jersey. coming up, there are cracks in the republican party. it's not just because of the norquist tax pledge. how to repair the gop message next on "your money." ♪ [ male announcer ] it's that time of year again. medicare open enrollment. time to compare plans and costs. you don't have to make changes. but it never hurts to see if you can find better coverage, save money, or both. and check out the preventive benefits you get after the health care law. ♪ open enrollment ends december 7th. so now's the time. visit medicare.gov or call 1-800-medicare. >>> a republican party relaunch. obama is bad for the economy message didn't work and it's not likely to resonate going forward. home prices cli
it from europe. we have $16 trillion in debt. back to the fiscal cliff, we went by. >> that's out of the way. >> you jumped the shark. you mentioned the dreaded cliff word. i'm cutting you all off. carol, abby, charles, thank you. you've been one of the most lively panels and the most aesthetically pleasing since yesterday. >>> when it comes to guns, my next guest knows it all-too well. gabby giffords husband, astronaut mark kelly. coming up next. [ sniffs ] i have a cold. [ sniffs ] i took dayquil but my nose is still runny. [ male announcer ] truth is, dayquil doesn't treat that. really? [ male announcer ] alka-seltzer plus fights your worst cold symptoms, plus it relieves your runny nose. [ breathes deeply ] awesome. [ male announcer ] yes, it is. that's the cold truth! capella university understands back from rough economic times. employees are being forced to do more with less. and the need for capable leaders is greater than ever. when you see these problems do you take a step back, or do you want to dive right in? with a degree in business from capella university, you'll ha
to happen here. there's a huge stake. everyone realizes. europe has got its problems. germany starting to feel the effects of the global, of the downturn in europe. china, cutting its growth forecasts, india doing the same. the last thing anyone on the world stage needs right now is for the u.s. to start sliding back into recession. but you know, let's be clear here. that's, that would take some time. there would still be time for some kind of a deal. but it's the uncertainty that is really driving everybody's nerves in all of this. it's going to affect commodity prices in countries like brazil. countries like russia, everybody is in this together. waiting to see what happens up there. >> you're absolutely right. we're going to be watching those international markets to see how everybody is reacting. it's this whole big chain, jim, thank you for that back home, the senate is still trying to work towards a deal as jessica just told us, senator harry reid earlier said that he is in fact hopeful about reaching a deal. listen. >> with 36 hours left until the country goes over the cliff, i
&p 500 which is a lot of people's 401(k)s is up more than 12% for 2012 and all of the nonsense in europe and the fiscal cliff, and the market is better than the long term average in 2012. i keep saying that if washington does not mess it up, 2013 could be a good year for america. >> you are absolutely right. so what we might find is that we might hit volatility in january and a rough month, but you know what, don't despair, because i think that as we move on, and listen, we will get through this and this is not the end of the world, b world, but the market will have to reprice the risk based on what they see. after that, then the market will start to make headway and we will see some turn around in china, right. seeing some turn around there already, and seeing the green shoots in the united states, but the only thing that we have to wor with ri about is europe and they are in recession and if they come out that is only going to add to the story. >> kenny, i love the optimism and you have seen many of these things come and go and it is useless and ridiculous to be in the position, but as
are under way in europe and canada. and they're halfway through a study offering this treatment to combat veterans, firefighters, and police officers. and here with me now is rachel hope. i should start off by pointing out, because people watch that -- no one is saying street ecstasy is safe. a lot of times you don't know what you're getting. but that wasn't the situation for you, necessarily. you were doing this in a very controlled setting. what was it like? you'd never done anything like this before. >> yeah, i've never done anything like that. but he made it so comfortable for me and prepared me, so when i got the medicine, i had an idea what would happen, but it was pretty remarkable. >> you described it, if i remember correctly, like your brain lit up like a christmas tree. >> yeah. >> so what is that? most people have no idea what that means. >> i don't either. i really want to know why it felt like that, like all my systems were lit up. like i was -- i just had all this access to my mind. i could control where i was thinking and going and look at things differently. >> how did you
doing a 5-500-day trip. that's when ships left europe and didn't plan to come back for years. >> i'm looking at the scene where you tell gabby, hey, i'm off to mars for 500 days. >> yeah, i don't think she would be digging it all that much. >> tell me about your mousetrout. why did you decide to do this? ? >> on my first space flight we carried mice on the trip and 17 of them did not like it and some of them enjoyed the experience. >>. >> it's a lot of fun. it's a lot of fun. i'm going to show it to my little daughter. mark, it's great to talk with you again. send my very best to gabby. how's she doing? >> she's doing very well, piers. you know, she's got a great attitude about her recovery, about where she's going. you know, she's getting involved in not exactly back to work but we've been involved in a new organization called the national institute for civil discourse. >> that's great. nice to talk to you. >> thanks for having me on, piers. appreciate it. >>> that's all for now. "ac 360" starts in a few moments. [ male announcer ] alka-seltzer plus presents the cold truth. i have
. really appreciate it. >>> it's kind of a blue christmas across much of europe. we are talking about the government's cut back on spending. instead of helping, we'll tell you how it actually spread the recession there. are everything. share "not even close." share "you owe me..." share "just right." the share everything plan. shareable data across 10 devices with unlimited talk and text. hurry in for a droid incredible 4g lte by htc for $49.99. time for citi price rewind. because your daughter really wants that pink castle thing. and you really don't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and if it finds one, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super sparkly day! ok. [ male announcer ] now all you need is a magic carriage. citi price rewind. start saving at citi.com/pricerewind. >> i'm saying to all of my family in trenton, njdz, i miss you all and love you all. if you missed, it's your fall. should have watched it. bye-bye. >> thank you for your service, car
, anemic u.s. growth, europe's financial crisis, china's slowdown. so proceed, but proceed with caution. co-founder and president of ulta capital management, jack otter, editor and author of "worth it, not worth it" and walter upgrade, editor for cnn. >>> figure how much money in stocks, how much in bonds largely determined how for a until you retire. the faurter you go the more in stocks. then stick to it. don't get swayed by gloom or euphoria. this year, per effect example. people scared, didn't invest much in stocks and a good year. s&p up about 16% year to date. bonds rose. diversified portfolio 4%. can't outguess them. don't try. >> make a strategy and stick with it. many viewers may be in the same spot. what one investor is worried about. lyn. >> i should have been very aggressive, but i played very conservative, and so how do you play catch-up? >> what's the best catch-up strategy? >> that is a very dangerous question. it's a very common question, and understandable, but the problem is, we all tend to make our decisions based on whatever has just happened. so this woman probably got
to a zoo in europe or australia to keep them fresh. the thing is that these animals are are so rare we have to know what the greeding program would be. >> that is a good question, if i find myself afraid or scared these guys know the animal very well. if they lick you, it is like sandpaper. >> these are like two of the last remaining tigers. >> are remember something, when a tiger like this takes down a water buffalo in less than ten seconds, they are the only cats in the world, they can eat up to 30 or 40 pounds in one sitting. i can tell you that, they may be small, but they are quite big. in egypt in the towns. >> it looks like a sphynx. >> he is biting your arm. >> you saw how big the tigers were. >> look at the ears. you see why the pharoas. >> they represent royalty. what is unique about this cat. they can jump ten feet in the air. they blend so well in the grass. they lay down and watch for a bird. >> they can grab the bird. look at those ears. that is what kind of gives them away. what is next. what are these? >> they are amazing. this is the cirvil cat. this cat is a cat that is fr
as well. talking about the banking giant hsbc, europe's largest, have to pay $2 billion to settle investigation by u.s. prosecutors who are looking into international drug money laundering. investigators say the bank ignored rules that could have stopped this laundering operation, that the money went to drug cartels and terrorists. jim bolden is joining us london. what happened? >> reporter: well, suzanne, this is interesting. all of these banks have been fined by the u.s. government over last few years but hsbc, by far, the biggest. this fine, as you say, $1.9 billion. the government says that this bank has not been complying with u.s. laws when it comes to finding out where the money is going to, where the money's come from. u.s. government says there s too much money coming from mexico for hsbc not to know between 2006 and 2009, that it must have been coming from money laundering from drug cartels. they say they have put now measures in place so it wouldn't happen again. >> why are we seeing problems with or european banks as well? huge international fine -- these fines on inte
to take down a jet liner in europe or africa. >> seth, isn't that the problem? what we saw in libya was all those weapons have gone missing. now they're elsewhere in northern africa and some got into the hands of hamas in gaza. syria seems to be libya on steroids in terms of the things that could go wrong. >> i think it's kind of ludicrous to provide them with surface to air missiles. i think what they need more than anything else is ammunition and small arms. they can do a lot with just that kind of activity. and really intelligence. especially with the internet going down, it's harder for them to communicate with each other. radios are down across the country. they need help in a range of ways. i think our intelligence apparatus and our special operations units can do this in general and have done this clandestinely over the years, so i think we can do this and provide some oversight. >> if we do it, do we have -- will it have any impact on the outcome? the u.s. does think strategically. like it or not, they do. if i'm giving you a gun, are you going to do something when you get i
against israel and would like to see the country disappear. countries especially in europe thought they were voting for something that would promote peace. they actually thought that by abstaining or supporting this vote, this would promote the idea of a two-state solution. the reason that they made a mistake is that in doing so, they were essentially privileging one aspect of the conflict which is statehood. over other important aspects that were not part of the resolution. and that's why ambassador rice mentioned it was counterproductive. essentially, the palestinians got an easy way to feel good which is nice and important. but without forcing them to actually take the difficult decisions that would truly lead to statehood at the end of the day. >> but let me ask a question. and that is, you know, the palestinian authority which was sort of almost a secondary player during israel and hamas' conflict in gaza, it seems as if when you say that they thought this vote would promote peace, doesn't it? the palestinian authority acknowledges israel's right to exist whereas hamas does no
about here, the evidence does seem to suggest it can be safe. similar studies are under way in europe and canada, and the doctor is studying the treatment to combat veterans, firefighters and police officers. dr. sanjay gupta, cnn, reporting. >> very interesting, dr. gupta, thank you. >>> and we're celebrating everyday people changing the word. up next, you will hear from a texas man who builds homes for wounded veterans. coming up. cleaner energy, while protecting our environment. across america, these technologies protect air - by monitoring air quality and reducing emissions... ...protect water - through conservation and self-contained recycling systems... ... and protect land - by reducing our footprint and respecting wildlife. america's natural gas... domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... that's smarter power today. domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... thank you, mr. speaker, uh, members of congress. in celebration of over 75 years of our government employees insurance company, or geico...as most of you know members it.congress. ...i propose sav
and hire folks. obviously globally the economy is still soft. europe is going to be in the dulldrums for quite some time and i think what all of you recognize and many of you have told me is that everybody is looking to america. because they understand that if we're able to put forward a long-term agenda for growth and prosperity that's broad-based here in the united states, then confidence will not just increase here in the united states, it will increase globally and we can get the kind of virtuous cycle that we all want to see. what is holding us back right now, ironically, is a lot of stuff that's going on in this town and i know that many of you have come down here to try to see, is there a way that we can break through the log jam and go ahead and get things done. and i'm here to tell you that nobody wants to get this done more than me. i know that you've got a lot of briefings but let me just try to describe where the situation is right now with respect to our fiscal situation, both what the opportunities are but what also the challenges are. i campaigned over the last year on
spending cuts. that's the austerity trap that europe has found itself in, and it would be crazy for us to go in that direction. >> before we go, very quickly, yes or no. do we have a deal by the end of the year? >> yes. >> and what about you, doug? >> marginally, yes. 60/40 in favor of a deal but they've got to get moving. >> we'll have to see if it's a real deal or another kick of the can down the road or some other interim thing. thanks for being here. >>> "outfront" next, the u.s. military draws up new plans for a potential strike against syria as we learn more about that country's stockpile of chemical weapons. >>> plus -- the u.s. supreme court agrees to take on the issue of gay marriage. and is that a signal, is that a signal that for republicans, it may be time to reconsider its view on this? >>> and a nurse duped by a prank call leaking information about the duchess of cambridge is found dead. all of that coming up. [ female announcer ] research suggests cell health plays a key role throughout our lives. one a day women's 50+ is a complete multivitamin designed for women's heal
in europe. but, the consequences would be relatively minor. it is more exposed to it's own difficulties, and it's own issues, than to what happens elsewhere in the world, because it is such a large player. >> so we're our own 5,000 pound gor ri gorilla. >> let me ask you as a final question, january 2nd arrives, no deal, what will we notice first? >> lack of citizen, markets would react very quickly, and it would react in the stock market really taking a hit. i would say it will depend on what's on the horizon. the debt ceiling, and the long-term deficit and debt levels, that would be different. >> so that plan, even if it's a little late, would, you think, be better -- >> better comprehensive fix. >> thank you for joining us. >> when we return, the perils of doing nothing. >> reports indicate that the president has adopted a deliberate strategy to slow walk our economy right to the edge of the fiscal cliff. >> this is the same republican leadership that had the house and senate in session barely a day. i gave birth to my daughter on may 18th, five days later, i had a massive heart atta
that everybody that works in the airline industry watches that movie. i was flying in europe on another airline, and the pilot, it was a really big plane that had extra seats in the cockpit, and before we took off one of the pilots came out and said come with me, and i went into the cockpit and they strapped me in and they took off and now they can tell everybody that we flew with murdoch. >> roger murdoch. i am an airline pilot. >> that actually happened. >> what is taller? you or the staffer? >> the statue is taller and it's taller than every other statue. i am closest to the street so everybody sees my statue first. >> how tall? >> 17 feet. >> it's an acknowledgment of what i achieved. >> what prompted you to write a children's book? >> i had an issue with the fact that so many kids, especially inner city kids don't think they can be a success unless they are involved in sports or entertainment. you take a young man growing up in harlem or the south side of chicago or here in atlanta and he wants to be jay-z, and he wants to be lebron james or denzel washingtons and he doesn't really see how
to be in great shape. >> we were on an airplane flying to europe, which we do every year, and we were up in a compartment just the two of us, and i woke up and it was just starting to get a little light. and i saw this figure with a shawl on and doing this mumbo jumbo, i thought maybe i had died. >> so then i said, when i tell the story, i say this is kind of man john mccain is. he things that heaven is populated by praying jews. what a guy. >> i had never known a person in my life that lives his religion to the degree that joe lieberman does. he's such a great contrast to people like me and lindsey because i've never seen him lose his temper. i've never seen him insult anyone, i've never seen him treat anyone but with the greatest courtesy. i cannot say that about lindsey or myself. >> your temper is legendary. >> very calm. >> very calm, level headed. >> absolutely. >> have you ever known him to not lose his temper? >> i just realized they do really -- >> 1973. >> they do a great service for me because i don't have to lose my temper, because they do it for me, they express it for me. y
in europe is something elsewhere, because of the euro situation, you have to cut people's wages, to make those countries competitive again. that's a completely different issue. austerity in terms of reversing this tremendous increase we've had in government spending over the last four years, we've gone from 2.9 trillion to 3.8 trillion in spending, a 30 odd percent increase in four years. and there's no trend or motivation so far to reverse that or normalize that. so again, austerity for the public sector is stimulus for the private sector. >> all right. shawn tully, thank you very much. >> happy new year, don. >> you too as well. >> thank you, don. >>> a mom and her kids reunited after they had been missing for nearly a week, thanks to a cnn viewer. thanks to you. hear their story next. hes, fev. and i relieve nasal congestion. overachiever. [ female announcer ] tylenol® cold multi-symptom nighttime relieves nasal congestion. nyquil® cold and flu doesn't. >>> it unfolded right here on cnn cnn. teresa nash came on our show making a desperate plea for help to find her two missing boys.
to ban gun laws that ban people from protecting themselves. all over europe there have been mass murders -- >> you're talking complete and utter -- >> people need to be able to defend themselves toe point of the crime and not for the police to come until after everybody's dead. >> what you said, mr. pratt, the gun deaths in australia and britain, they are 35 people killed a year. your country is 12,000. >> your murder rate is lower than hours, that is true. >> it's 35 against 12,000. >> your violent crime rate -- your violent crime rate is higher than ours, as is the violent crime rate in australia. america is not the wild west that you are depicting. we only have the problem in our cities and unhappily in our schools where people like you have been able to get laws put on the books that keep people from being able to defend themselves. i honestly don't understand why you would rather have people be victims of a crime than be able to defend themselves. it's incomprehensible. >> you're an unbelievably stupid man, aren't you? >> it seems to. he you're morally obtuse. you seem to be able to
, probably because it's pretty clear china is both a competitor and a partner. >> number 4, europe. the european union was fractured by too much debt and the us a trty plans to fix it. that saga is far from over. >> number 3, the housing market finally bottomed out. the combination of low home prices and continued record low mortgage rates set off a building and buying spree. investors began buying entire neighborhoods but first-time buyers were also able to get a home of their own for the first time in years. as long as they had a hefty down payment. >> number 2. >> cnn projects that barack obama will be reelected president of the united states. >> the next. more than just about obama and romney. it was about socialism and capitali capitalism, about what kind of role government should have in your life. >> number 1 is the fiscal cliff. lawmakers saw it coming but didn't bother to pay any attention to it until after the election. had they put politics aside and dealt with it earlier, who knows how strong the u.s. economy would be right now. >> so those are the top 10 business stori
to you. europe has seen its own budget crisis over the past few years. are there any valuable take aways that lawmakers in the u.s. could use as guidance? >> i'm not sure. i thought very long and hard since i knew we were discussing this for parallels. and i think what you really come down to is that of compromise. and the ability to do a deal. when in the face of opposition, you just have to get something done because the ramifications are so serious if you don't. in the case of the eurozone, you had 27 countries and nobody could agree and you had different political philosoph s philosophies. that sounds similar to the fiscal cliff and certainly the eurozone pushed things to the absolute limit. almost to breaking point during the summer where again and again they would not agree until disaster was on their doorstep. that's the similarity to what we're seeing tonight. >> i know. we're hearing that negotiations are ongoing. they are continuing. there are a number of issues on both sides. ryan lizza following this. it appears as though obviously some elements of this have to be pushed for
. as you know, senator inouyer is informed europe, where he was wounded and obviously, his amazing story of bravery during world war ii happened but he is being interred here at the punch bowl. senate majority leader harry reid is here, eulogized senator inouye and senator daniel acaca. it is fascinating, president obama is at thor is is mony watching this happen, just a reminder of just how long serving representing hawaii daniel inouye did, he represented hawaii from 1959, from before president obama was even born. he has been a main stay here in hawaiian politics and? a very significant moment for this state. >> also amazing that this guy served in world war two while members of his family were interred back in the u.s. an absolute hero. brianna, thank you very much. >>> no matter how the fiscal cliff negotiations play out, the wealthy will probably see their taxes go up, but congress can't seem to agree on hot wealthy is or are. even if they figure that out, there's also disagreement about how their taxes should go up. cnn's lisa sylvester sat down with a megamillionaire who says he
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